Fansub Review: [FFF] Hidamari Sketch X Honeycomb (Episode 03)

B-Tier, Fansub Review — By on December 10, 2012 1:10 pm

This post was written by Dark_Sage. He is Dark_Sage.

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This is Shaft using their powers for evil. Why, Shaft? Why?

Table of Contents

Release Information

Visual Quality

Script Quality

Results

Release Information

Episode details.

Release format: MKV (368 MB, 10-bit)

Japanesiness: Honorifics.

English style: A combination of British English and American English. …I think.

Encoding details: http://pastebin.com/tA1znWdy

Speed: Slow (>48 hours)

 

External links.

Group website: http://fffansubs.org/

IRC channel: #[email protected]

SubCompare screenshot comparisons: http://www.subcompare.com/hidamari_sketch_x_honeycomb/

Commie’s fansub reviews: http://notredrevie.ws/autumn-2012-reviews/#hidamari

 

Visual Review

Karaoke.

Opening. Lots of colors everywhere and an enjoyable font. What’s not to like?

Rating: Good.

 

Ending. I wasn’t blown away, but it was decent.

Rating: Okay.

 

 

Typesetting.

Prepare yourself. …Though I doubt your body will ever be ready for this.

The “EXIT” here was hardsubbed by Shaft.

So yeah, there were a few signs in this release.

 

 

 

Script Review

Karaoke.

You can’t match “everything” with “them”. “everyone” would work, but not “everything”.

 

 

Main Script.

Finally a fucking error. You know how many signs I had to screenshot to get to this point in the episode? Fucking 23.

open -> opening

The way this reads, it’s like she stayed late at school or the library or something, but from how I interpreted it, she merely “stayed up late”, which is quite different from what FFF has.

Why not just say “fire truck”?

My Amerigaijin mind pretty much shut down on this line. Must be British English cuz I’ve never seen “regular division” in this context before. It makes me wonder how much trouble American subs have caused viewers over the ages. It makes me wonder… and smile.

Apparently this isn’t British English — it’s just shit English. My bad.

This is so… wrong.

“but on the other hand, you managed to go through roll call relatively quickly.”

“Second- and third-year students, please be more considerate”

Yes, the dash on “Second” is necessary, but it’s not something I’d really count against anyone. The main issue here is that the principal is addressing the second- and third-year students, so you need a comma to reflect this.

I broke my nutbladder at this point.

Kind of left field for “Watashi mo”, eh? I assume FFF went with this because they didn’t want to repeat “Me too.” for all 10 of the girls that said it, but “Sorry.” just doesn’t fit.

Add something to it if you must make it different from the other lines. Something like “And me too.” would be sufficient.

 

 

Results

Watchability: Quite watchable.

Visual grade: A-

Script grade: B

Overall grade: B+

Not a bad release at all. In fact I’d even say it was pretty good. I’m gonna say that FFF is the group to go with for the show.
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14 Comments

P32L says:

You sure “hook-and-ladder truck” is British? I thought they used the term “lorry”. Either way, I’m pretty sure the confusion stems from the topic of conservation and the obscure jargon.

Dark_Sage says:

It’s a word that I’ve never heard before but it comes up on google searches as something that exists, so I figured it was British English or something. If it’s not British English, it must be regional because for someone to use “hook-and-ladder truck” over “fire truck”, it has to be a common enough term to use the words interchangeably.

P32L says:

I think they were just being needlessly specific. Not sure if it’s the studio’s fault or the sub group’s, though.

Dark_Sage says:

Hmm, that would make sense, I guess. More google searches reveal it’s just specific type of fire truck rather than a term you’d use in place of “fire truck”. Oh English, you hide your secrets so well.

FalseDawn says:

Confirmed as not Brit-specific. Interesting fact for you, though: we call them “fire engines”.

corocoro says:

> Nothing really new takes place.
Adverbs can modify adjectives, so this is not exactly an error. Unless the nuance in Japanese is set differently, of course.

Dark_Sage says:

Well both lines have different meanings, and I wasn’t feeling FFF’s.
“Nothing really new takes place.” is the shortened version of “Nothing that’s really new takes place.” Here, the emphasis is on the “really new” part. So things that are new may take place.
“Nothing new really takes place.” is different. Here, the emphasis is on nothing new ever (really) taking place.

I felt the latter made more sense.

corocoro says:

And I feel the former fits better for a daily life show – there are different things happening, but they’re all just minor bumps in the road of life. Nothing that shakes the world, so to speak. And that’s quite different from every day being the same.

Besides, “Nothing new really takes place” reads like crap – “actually” would fit better in the sentence and with the editor being otherwise good, a blunder like that is not likely.

Dark_Sage says:

I’ll buy it.

FalseDawn says:

Need context to verify the “regular division” bit. In my head, that’s an army thing? Like, you have the regular divisions and the reserves, maybe? I’m not sure – it’s pretty obscure jargon even if it is Brit-specific.

Dark_Sage says:

She was using the term to describe a group of school kids. When I looked it up, I found a couple British sites so I jumped to conclusions.

Dark_Sage says:

And after that convo on IRC, looks like it wasn’t British English — it was just bad English. Review updated.

herkz says:

Yeah, pretty sure she means the gen. ed. class.

FalseDawn says:

Just call me the British consultant *wonders if there’s a wage for that position…*

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