Fansub Review: [WhyNot] Uta no Prince-sama (Episode 02)

B-Tier, Fansub Review — By on July 27, 2011 5:49 pm

This post was written by Dark_Sage. He is Dark_Sage.

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So, this is like the female equivalent of Queen’s Blade, right? I don’t care. I’m hooked now. >_<

File size: 244 MB

Release format: MKV

Japanesiness: Honorifics. Japanese name order.

Karaoke. OP/Insert/ED. To put it bluntly, it’s not very good.

Typesetting.

These two lines go together, so why did you capitalize “My”? Also, lol random rainbow words. YOU GUYS SO FUNNY

Newsflash: Randomly turning lines all rainbow-colored doesn’t make you cute. It doesn’t make you rebels. And it certainly doesn’t make your subs better. It just shows that you’re desperate attention whores with nary a talent for anything even approaching wit.

Best practice:

each other = two

one another = more than two

You might want to think about phrasing this into Class A/Class B/etc.

Either

“Ittoki-kun is really kind.” or “Ittoki-kun really is kind.”

That’s how it’s phrased in spoken English.

Never use more than two of the same letter in a row. Notable exception: If it’s comically drawn-out, but even then we fansubbers use the ~ for that.

Hmm… > Hmmm… > Hmmmmmmm… > Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm…

Huh? I know they used “keyword” in English, but the line doesn’t have to look so… awkward, does it?

lol. I don’t think you know what idiosyncratic means.

Again, lrn2accent.

But I do like that tune!

This is so far from good writing it’s like a Twilight fanfic written by JK Rowling.

“You’re satisfied with that?”(line 1) -> “I’m happy with that.”(line 2)   XXX NO XXX

“You’re satisfied with that?” -> Fucking anything else, really. *** YES ***

 

 

Watchability: Quite watchable. … if you’re 12 and just love LOL RANDOM RAINBOWS.

Overall grade: B-

As a whole, the English is decent. If you can stand lolrainbows and shitty karaoke, you could probably handle their release. Too bad that NyanTaku is so slow. :/

This review was a lot more negative before I remembered that these guys actually had some decent releases in this season. Oh boy, you should’ve seen the things I had down before that~~

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12 Comments

Nona says:

It always amazes me how capable you are when it comes to objective reviews.

Dark_Sage says:

Elaborate.

Quattro says:

You really {i1}do{i0} love us <3.

Nyara♥ says:

LOL RANDOM RAINBOWS~

kuu says:

so gay~

Dark_Sage says:

<3

anon1213 says:

“each other = two

one another = more than two

I keep repeating this rule, but no one gets it. ._.”

Rule? There is no rule for it. I keep repeating this, too, but no one gets it.

“Each other and one another are both pronouns, and their uses are almost identical. Both phrases refer to one of two or more people or things that are doing something together or are in some sort of relationship with one or more members of the group. […] Some people say that each other should only be used of two people or things and that one another is used of more than two people or things, but our evidence shows that this is not the case. If you want to observe the rule, you can, but you do not need to. You can used each other and one another the same way.” – Webster

Heck, even GG (no, not the trolls) is basically saying, “A lot of people think it should be two for one and more than two for the other, but it really doesn’t matter.”

(Actual quote, “Since there never was any historical support for this rule, but since there are people who believe in it today, should you follow it? Personally, I’d say no, but the good news is that it’s an easy rule to follow if you choose to. Unlike using “whom” or saying “It is she,” limiting “each other” to two people and “one another” to more than two isn’t going to make your writing sound unnatural. Both sound fine in either situation, whether you’re observing or ignoring the rule.”)

Long story short, you need to do your research more thorough before you even decide to take the word “rule” into your… hands, I guess, and editors need to step up their game. Oh and, this makes the above mentioned “mistake” invalid.

Dark_Sage says:

Okay, fine. Strongly-suggested guideline, then. Are you familiar with the concept of best practices? That’s essentially what I’m advocating here.

In my mind, this is much like “alright” vs. “all right”. Sure. Both can be correct, but one is more correct. It’s a best practice to use “all right”. Similarly, “each other” should be used for two people and “one another” for more than two.

I guess your “Gotcha!” post means I should tone down the severity of my criticism, but it is still legitimate.

anon1213 says:

This wasn’t by all means a “LOLOL-GOTCHA-BITCH” post, but rather a “There-Is-No-Rule-For-It” post. I agree with your post, though, and can live with your argumentation. This is quite a divisive matter and I appreciate your thoughtfulness. Now then, you can continue to be an ass again. After all, this is why I visit this page in the first place. :p Can’t resist my love for assholes.

Dark_Sage says:

I shall continue with pleasure.

I want to be careful, though, that I don’t give off the impression that I didn’t appreciate your post. Constructive criticism and keeping me honest on these reviews is pretty much the only way this site can remain relevant. So, thanks for that. <3

elle says:

What’s the point of highlighting the “do” in “I do like you” – “do” already functions as a highlighter *grammatically*. Perhaps, dark_sage merely wanted more rainbow-coloured words ^^

And what IS with those best pracices? Who on Earth created them?
Shakespeare about two persons:
“When we are married, and have more occasion to know _one another_.”
Just which word in the “each other” limits it to the two? There’s a plethora of other examples (incl. the Bible) when both phrases are used within a single sentence and refer to the same group of objects. There’s neiter a single rule, nor a definite agreement in the grammar world about it. All dictionaries I can think of consider them interchangable.
And it’s no good to mix “alright vs. all right” and “each other vs. one another” when referring to best practices. “alright”, though it has certain specific meanings in the modern English, is simply grammatically unacceptable in the formal language. This is not the case with “each other”, which as noted above, can be used interchangably with “one another” in formal writing.

Onion says:

lolrainbows. That’s hilarious.

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