Fansub Review: [Nutbladder] JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure (Episode 01)

Fansub Review: [Nutbladder] JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure (Episode 01)

This post was written by Dark_Sage. He is Dark_Sage.

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A functioning nutbladder is fun for everyone!

Table of Contents

Release Information

Visual Quality

Script Quality

Results

Release Information

Episode details.

Release format: MKV (384 MB, 10-bit)

Japanesiness: No honorifics.

English style: American English.

Encoding details: http://pastebin.com/Fi9mtQNp

Speed: Quick (<48 hours)

 

External links.

Group website: http://www.onezerotwo.net/

IRC channel: #(X’_____’)@irc.rizon.net

SubCompare screenshot comparisons: http://www.subcompare.com/jojo%27s_bizarre_adventure/

Commie’s fansub reviews: http://notredreviews.wordpress.com/autumn-2012-reviews/

 

Visual Review

Karaoke.

Karaoke was not subbed because it’s in Engrish.

 

Typesetting.

Translating the credits? Interesting decision.

Not translating the title? Interesting decision.

Looks like Nutbladder is the leading source of interest-causing actions these days.

Not really sure how to describe these. Maybe “kanji flash”? Anyway, these kanji flashes appear pretty frequently in this episode and remain untypeset. Nothing of particular value is lost by leaving these unsubbed, so I’m not gonna call it an issue.

Why the fuck is this translated?

That which was typeset was not done very well and I’m unsure of how they came to the decision to typeset what they did.

 

Script Review

Karaoke.

N/a.

 

Main Script.

“Did Daddy buy you a doll, Erina?” or “Did your daddy buy you a doll, Erina?”

Yes, even if they’re mocking her, English rules still apply.

Should be “This is my pet dog, Danny.”

This lack of comma knowledge springs up a few times in this episode but this was the most annoying one of them.

I may or may not have let out an audible guffaw at this point; something the younger generation calls “the LOLing”.

But I do have an issue with the line. When it comes to redundant questions, I feel a question mark should be applied. It is arguable as to whether or not this is not necessary and I’ve had that argument quite a few times on this site, but including the question mark is a definite best practice for fansubbing. However, I consider it about as serious as an annoying comma splice, which is “not very”. Still, I’m willing to listen if anyone has a good reason why redundant questions, despite being questions, should not have a question mark.

What in the what?

Too long for the time allotted.

Try “Wow, I didn’t know that.” It cuts out three syllables.

That last part is unnecessary. “Why? Why did you do that?”

You mean “Ever since he came to live here,” because as it reads, JoJo’s saying that the world began shutting him out as soon as Dio was born, which is not the case.

The only comma splice in this release I felt like bitching about. Seriously, people. Get it fucking together.

(In case you didn’t know, these don’t tilt the final score very much even though I do consider them fucking annoying.)

I… what?

Best to avoid putting subs four lines up. Nutbladder needs an overlap text and splitting that top sentence over two lines would bring this preview down to a reasonable two-liner standard.

 

Results

Watchability: Watchable.

Visual grade: C-

Script grade: B-

Overall grade: C+

A much better option than gg’s. I lasted one minute into their release before calling this match-up for Nutbladder. I’m sure you’ll see me bitch about gg’s release sometime soon in the future, but just know for now that you’ll be better off with Nutbladder.

35 thoughts on “Fansub Review: [Nutbladder] JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure (Episode 01)”

  1. >A much better option than gg’s. I lasted one minute into their release before calling this match-up for Nutbladder. I’m sure you’ll see me bitch about gg’s release sometime soon in the future, but just know for now that you’ll be better off with Nutbladder.

    But what about the British English, man? It’s like, set in England or something.

    hurr

  2. An honest, unbiased assessment would be highly desired of gg’s release.

    The criteria for the above conditions would require the full 24 minutes of viewing.

    Thank you for being fair to the people.

  3. “Not really sure how to describe these. Maybe “kanji flash”? Anyway, these kanji flashes appear pretty frequently in this episode”

    New to JJBA, aren’t you?

    • I was trying to think about how I’d handle that earlier and couldn’t come up with anything, so I think it’s probably best for me to leave joke subs alone for now.

  4. > “You don’t care if you lose those four fingers, do you!”

    Do we need a question mark here, because of the “do you” part?

    • It’s a best practice to have question marks at the end of questions, and I certainly think it’s retarded to avoid doing so, but because English was not developed with the idea of having two forms of ending punctuation at the end of a sentence, it is also sometimes correct to make a choice between two accurate forms of ending punctuation. In this case, if you were following a standard of “one piece of ending punctuation per line” you would have to choose between an exclamation mark and a question mark. The individual in charge of this line felt it was more important to convey the exclamatory tone of the line than the inquisitive part.

      As you may have guessed by now, this is, in part, what led toward the development of the interrobang — a combination of a question mark and an exclamation mark into one piece of ending punctuation that got across the meaning of both.

      However, in fansubbing, and honestly in MOST forms of literature today, you’ll find that people disregard the old method and find two (or more) pieces of ending punctuation acceptable. I personally think it’s stupid to go by a “one piece” rule, but I also acknowledge its technical correctness in certain situations. Any editor which relies on the “one piece” rule probably isn’t a good editor as they likely haven’t thought about it very much. I will choose to deduct points if groups abuse their choice in ending punctuation though. (You can’t just pretend question marks don’t exist.)

      • Depends on what’s being said. But most of the time, rhetorical or not, it’s common and preferred practice to add a question mark to the end of any question.

      • Given a wide support for rhetorical questions not requiring question marks, I’m curious what stances people take on grammatical statements that elicit responses (e.g. “I wonder why”). Whilst I’ve heard from most that these invariably mustn’t take a question mark, I’m not convinced it’s such a clear-cut issue.

        • Same here, P32L. While I do think it’s best to not add question marks to statements which aren’t technically questions, I understand their use as a means of conveying the meaning of the line. If it’s said in a questioning tone, then I can understand why they’d put a question mark there. I don’t feel comfortable editing like that myself, but I can see the arguments for it.

        • It’s not a wide support – as the two above me already stated, it’s best practice to use question marks on every question because the sentence will pretty much always look stupid otherwise.
          That’s why I’d go with changing the rhetoric question to a normal sentence if tempted to not use a question mark, same as I would change the sentences you mention into questions if the situation warrants – unless you’re an ultra weeboo, you’ll find that mirroring sentence types in a translation 100% is a bad idea.

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